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GLOW at De Caai

De Caai, an emerging part of the city, also shines during GLOW. A handful of light art projects puts the former Campina site in the spotlight. A bonus: the following tips will take you to undiscovered places.

How to get to De Caai

From Central Station, it is about a 30-minute walk to De Caai. You could take bus 5 to 't Hofke (stop DAF Museum), but we recommend walking or cycling. This way, you pass the GLOW highlights in the center.

Everything you need to know about GLOW

Is GLOW entirely new for you, or are you just curious about what this year's light art festival looks like? Here are our answers to the most frequently asked questions.

All practical info

Loom Light @Kanaaldijk

When walking to De Caai, you will encounter the permanent light monument called Loom Light. Titia Ex created the work as a tribute to Jan Zwartendijk and many other invisible resistance heroes during World War II. It's many things in one: a book, a hand, even a reference to Hanukkah. What do you see in it?

Falsche Frage @De Caai

Light is enchanting; the light artwork Falsche Frage is hypnotic, thank to two elements: geometric shapes and blue flashing lights. One symbolizes a recurring balance, the other turmoil. You may have spotted Charles Vreuls' work during a previous edition of GLOW, but it doesn't hurt to be captivated by the blue light more than once.

Dreaming Demons @hidden location

In Dreaming Demons, visitors enter an almost apocalyptic post-humanity scene where unrecognizable creatures have taken over. Instead of using digital screens or video mapping, the decor consists of ropes, spindles, and motors. If you're one of the lucky few (max. 50 per night) to find the installation, an extraordinary adventure awaits you.  

Carbon Arc @Kanaaldijk-Zuid

After more than a year of restoring, Ivo Schoofs and Pepe Heijnen have produced a remarkable achievement. Carbon Arc is not just any light source; it's a coal spit lamp that produces more than 400m3 of light floating above the canal. It's a rather powerful searchlight from 1942. The lamp, used to spot enemy planes during WW2, will make an impressive comeback during GLOW.

Ode to Light @De Melkfabriek

Instead of projecting his work on a facade, Daniel Margraf takes a step inside with Ode to Light. His colorful patterns manage to transform an industrial hall into a cathedral full of light. A spectacle you won't soon get bored of, we estimate.

More GLOW?

There's a lot more to discover during GLOW! Like the installations in the city center. Looking for the whole program? Take a look at the website of GLOW!